Your red blood cells do important work for your body. And they do it well because they’re missing one thing: nuclei.

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When groups of microorganisms live in communities, they can both cause and solve problems for people.

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Scientists can use GWAS results to learn all kinds of things about you from your genes. One day, doctors may even use this information to personalize your medical care.

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Learn about how and why we itch. (4:43 min.)

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When you cut your finger, a complex, three-level system kicks in to make sure you stay healthy and ward off invaders.

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Your smartphone, tablet and other devices emit large quantities of blue light wavelengths. This tells your body "wake up!" when you should be getting ready to sleep. (2:50 min.)

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In people with synesthesia, stimulating one sense leads to the stimulation of another. Letters might always have a certain colour, or subway stations might have a taste!

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Your cells may be tiny, but they can do some pretty complex tasks to keep you alive. That’s because your cells, like the cells of every living organism, have specialized proteins constantly hard at work.

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In clinic, I use my understanding of functional human anatomy and body mechanics to help diagnose and treat issues with muscle, joints and nerves. A key role is patient education and helping patients take an active role in their own recovery. On a daily basis, I work very closely with other health care providers. As a health care consultant, I work with case managers and medical and health consultants to help injured workers recover from injury.

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If you get seasick, it’s probably because what you see doesn’t match what you feel. So to understand motion sickness, you need to understand how your body senses motion.

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