Achieving Accuracy in SMBG

Andrew SchulzI am Andrew Schulz and I am in Gr. 10. I have been Scholar of the Year in Grade 8 and 9 and continue to maintain 4.0 Honour Roll standing. I am honoured to be at CWSF for the second time. My science fair projects have been Diabetes related for the last three years and my goal is to ultimately improve the lives of the millions of people who live with diabetes. At our regional fair, my project earned a gold medal, the Canadian Diabetes Award, Best in Health Category, and the BCIC Innovation Award. For the last two years, I have been honoured to share my projects at the local Annual Diabetes Convention.

In school, I am active in our Student Leadership Group. Outside of school, I volunteer in the community with my Youth Group. I am a Level 1 Referee for hockey and enjoy working for people doing yard work and snow shovelling. I enjoy outdoor activities like mountain biking, camping and watersports. I continue learning to play piano. My advice for students thinking of doing a science fair project is to challenge yourself, have a focus and think outside the box. I hope to become a radiologist.

SMBG (Self Monitoring Blood Glucose) is what diabetics do to manage their disease and determine if any course of action needs to be taken, so accurate SMBG readings are vital. This project examined whether residue of various substances on fingers (the usual test site) would affect readings and was there an alternative to hand washing that would help diabetics achieve accurate results in SMBG?

Winner of the Excellence Award - Gold Medal (Intermediate) at the Canada Wide Science Fair 2013

Canada Wide Science Fair

The Canada-Wide Science Fair (CWSF®) is a national event that brings together 500 top young scientists (in grades 7-12/Cégep) from across the country to compete for highly prized cash, scholarship, and science experience awards.


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