How do you balance chemical equations?

CurioCity
23 January 2012

Question

How do you balance chemical equations?

Answer

Balancing chemical equations isn't hard once you get the hang of it. The thing you need to keep in mind is that in the universe, you can't gain or lose matter, so what you start with is what you end with (you have to have the same number of atoms on each side of the arrow). For example: A+B -> A7B3 The final molecule is made up of 7 A atoms and 3 B atoms, but according to this formula, you're only putting in one A and one B. Clearly this formula needs balancing. 7A+3B -> A7B3 This can get a little more tricky when you're rearranging molecules: A2B + C -> A7B3 + BC In this case, you will need 7 A's, but they only come in sets of 2 (you can't have half a molecule of A2B). You can do this: 7A2B +_C -> 2A7B3 +BC That works for A, but now you have 7 B's on the left side! On the right side you have 6 B's from A7B3, and one from BC. This adds to 7 B's, therefore your equation is balanced.

Answered By: Science Travels

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