Mac Smith - Student

CurioCity Careers
21 February 2018

Mac Smith

Student, SD#34 Abbotsford, BC

I was born/grew up in: Abbosford BC

I now live in: Abbosford BC

I completed my training/education at: In progress

Describe what you do at work.

I am a grade 8 student at Clayburn Middle School. I have played hockey since I was five years old and have experienced two concussions. Many players do not like to leave the ice when they have been hit. Sometimes, parents and coaches are reluctant to take their children off of the ice if the hit does not look too bad. There is a lot of pressure on some athletes to continue playing even after sustaining a concussion. I have personally stayed on the ice after a big hit to the head and I believe that may have made my concussion worse. Therefore, I wanted to develop a system that could be installed within a helmet to measure force impact and alert the officials, coaches and parents when a player has received enough impact force to cause a concussion. This objective measurement would take the decision making out of player and coaches hands, allowing officials to automatically remove athletes from the ice when they have received enough impact force to cause a concussion. My hope is that my idea can make a difference for young hockey players like me.

How does your job affect people’s lives?

I hope the system I developed will help prevent serious, long term effects from sport-related concussions.

What motivates you in your career?

I was motivated to try and solve this problem by a personal injury. I enjoy problem solving and am involved in science fairs so it seemed like a good fit to try to develop an objective way to decide if someone might be suffering from a concussion.

Describe your career path to this career.

I have played hockey since I was five years old and have experienced two concussions. Many players do not like to leave the ice when they have been hit. Sometimes, parents and coaches are reluctant to take their children off of the ice if the hit does not look too bad. There is a lot of pressure on some athletes to continue playing even after sustaining a concussion. I have personally stayed on the ice after a big hit to the head and I believe that may have made my concussion worse. Therefore, I wanted to develop a system that could be installed within a helmet to measure force impact and alert the officials, coaches and parents when a player has received enough impact force to cause a concussion. This objective measurement would take the decision making out of player and coaches hands, allowing officials to automatically remove athletes from the ice when they have received enough impact force to cause a concussion. My hope is that my idea can make a difference for young hockey players like me.

What activities do you like to do outside of work?

Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball, Rugby, Drawing, Cross Country, Reading, Music, Help raise money for cystic fibrosis, Raising money for Cops For Cancer.

What advice or encouragement would you give others seeking a similar career?

I would recommend people to do science fairs.

CurioCity Careers

We hope you enjoyed learning about this great STEM career! The information in this career profile was provided by this individual especially for CurioCity. We hope it helped give you a sense of what this type of job is really like.

Let’s Talk Science is pleased to provide you with this information as you explore future career options. Many careers require a background in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Even jobs that don’t use specific STEM concepts on a day-to-day basis benefit from the skills gained through a study of STEM. People with a STEM background are very much in demand by employers across all career sectors. If you would like to learn about more careers that have a STEM connection, visit http://www.explorecuriocity.org/careers.







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