Showing results for: Health & Human Body

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I’m the Director of CanChild. I’m also Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and hold the Scotiabank Chair in Child Health Research at McMaster University. I supervise students from the undergraduate through to the postdoctoral level. As well, I work as a physiatrist at McMaster Children’s Hospital.

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Here’s a conundrum: Identical twins originate from the same DNA ... so how can they turn out so different — even in traits that have a significant genetic component? (5:02 min.)

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Your cells may be tiny, but they can do some pretty complex tasks to keep you alive. That’s because your cells, like the cells of every living organism, have specialized proteins constantly hard at work.

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Chocolate doesn’t necessarily cause acne. And it has some health benefits that might surprise you. It all comes down to understanding what’s in chocolate and how it affects your body.

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In clinic, I use my understanding of functional human anatomy and body mechanics to help diagnose and treat issues with muscle, joints and nerves. A key role is patient education and helping patients take an active role in their own recovery. On a daily basis, I work very closely with other health care providers. As a health care consultant, I work with case managers and medical and health consultants to help injured workers recover from injury.

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If you get seasick, it’s probably because what you see doesn’t match what you feel. So to understand motion sickness, you need to understand how your body senses motion.

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Eventually, everybody dies. But that doesn’t mean that scientists shouldn’t work to help people live the longest, most enjoyable life possible.

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An Italian doctor wants to transplant a quadriplegic patient’s head onto a donor body. Is this is the next leap in regenerative medicine, or just a whacked-out idea from a latter-day Dr. Frankenstein.

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The first monaural stethoscope was invented by physician Rene Laennec in France in 1816. This small and sturdy device greatly improved the physician's ability to listen to internal body sounds. This is a replica, produced in 1929 for the History of Medicine Museum in Toronto, of the earliest wooden model stethoscope.

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There are a lot of studies that talk about the health benefits of breakfast. But some of them require a closer look. They don’t necessarily show that breakfast causes good health.

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