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Hank looks at some of the research on smells and memory and explains how smells can bring back early memories -- even memories that your brain didn’t know you had. (3:43 min)

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This video, inspired by the film “The Martian” explores the psychological and physiological impacts of space on the human body.

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Join Dr. Tracy Vaillancourt from the University of Ottawa as she talks about recent research into bullying and the effect that it has on mental health. Dr. Vaillancourt explains how environmental interactions, or moderators, can change the outcomes for teens that are bullied.

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Gene Giacomelli, director of the University of Arizona Controlled Environment Agriculture Center (CEAC), was excited to share the same challenges in growing crops as the fictitious Mr. Watney experienced while stranded on Mars, as depicted in the 2015 book and movie, "The Martian".

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Through a series of live, staged scenes, young students present how a lack of response from peers that see bullying happen is all too common.

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Bullying is not limited to the schoolyard or home - it is becoming a common occurrence online. This video describes the act of ‘cyberbullying’ as a virus that is infecting the world - one computer at a time.

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Bullying behaviour results from negative interactions between peers. This powerful short film shows what life is like from the perspective of a high school student that is being bullied, and from the students that are doing the bullying.

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We have over 600 muscles in our bodies that help bind us together, hold us up, and help us move. Your muscles also need your constant attention, because the way you treat them on a daily basis determines whether they will wither or grow. Muscle growth requires a good mix of sleep, nutrition and exercise to keep your muscles as big and strong as possible. (4:19 min.)

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Race car driver Amy Castell explains the science and technology of racing helmets.

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Scientists have been deliberately sabotaging walking robots to see how fast they learn to cope and adapt to mechanical faults.

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