Got the winter blues? Maybe you're SAD. That's Seasonal Affective Disorder. S.A.D. is a type of depression that affects some people every winter between September and April, especially between December and February.

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A whopping 1 out of 8 teens suffer from depression. People prone to depression have differences in how their brain works and responds to stress —it's a physiological thing. As a chronic disease, depression can resurface later on.

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Unfortunately, abnormal stress responses, such as panic attacks, are quite common and cause a lot of turmoil in some teens' lives. But what exactly is a "panic attack"?

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Schizophrenia affects about 1% of the population of Canada, and most often hits males between 15-25 and females 25-35. It's a chronic debilitating mental disorder that is often misunderstood.

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There is a lot more to laughing than just the ha ha ha's. From a basic physiological level, to sociocultural situations laughter is complex and integral part of our life.

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Now I'm sure you would probably feel hard-pressed to say you never talked about other people, as many scientists believe this phenomenon of gossip actually has biological and evolutionary roots? Here's the scoop...

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The science behind why we get Writer's Block and how to over-come it.

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Exercise has many physiological (e.g., physical) and psychological (e.g., mental) effects that can improve mood as well as relieve stress, increase self-esteem, and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. Let's take a closer look.

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Targeting the teenage demographic may seem like a wise idea to coffee chains; however, a problem arises when teens are encouraged to drink caffeinated beverages without realizing the possible consequences to their bodies.

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Nintendo DS BrainTraining promises to increase your brain capacity through a series of exercises that stimulate the flow of blood to the prefrontal cortex, inspired by the work of a prominent Japanese neuroscient Dr. Kawashima.

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