Showing results for: Math & Physics

What causes static cling and how can you control it?

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Bluetooth signals are very similar to the wireless signals used in WiFi devices, radio and television broadcasts and mobile phones. These signals are transmitted by electromagnetic radiation, the very same phenomenon that produces light that you can see.

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Google, Facebook, Wikipedia, Twitter, YouTube ... can you imagine a world without access to the internet? Mobile phones, BlackBerries, laptops, iPads and iPhones ... what about a world without instant access to the Internet everywhere?

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Have you ever wondered whether it’s the ball or your swing that affectsyour golf game? Although your swing has a lot to do with it, the modern design of the golf ball — with itslittle dimples — also has an impact on how well you play.

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In the game of tennis, it is absolutely critical to be able to read how the ball is going to bounce; however, not all surfaces are equal. Differently surfaced tennis courts can have extreme effects on the ball, completely changing your strategy.

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Who doesn’t love summer? Cookouts, ice cream, and trips tothe beach! Next time you’re at the beach, grab some friends and join a sand-physics-volleyball game!

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If you turn off all the lights in your house late at night, you can probably still find your way by the dim glow of your electronics. Even if you turn your electronics “off”, are they really off?

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During a lightning strike, the air surrounding the bolt of lightning is heated to about 39,000 °C! This sudden increase in pressure and temperature caused by the lightning causes the air immediately around the lightning to “explode” all along its length.

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The use of kilometers is no longer a sensible unit for measuring distances in space due to its vastness. To overcome this, astronomers came up with the light-year.

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Bzzzzzzz. The sound of beehives has become the soundtrack of soccergames at the FIFA World Cup. The buzzing sound is made by plastic hornscalled vuvuzelas. The sound is unmistakable, and  hundreds of them at a time are being blown constantly during games.

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