Showing results for: Nature of Science

Learn about how and why we itch. (4:43 min.)

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It’s in our tap water, toothpaste and even in tea. Fluoride has helped reduce cavities in children for decades. Still, more than 70 years after Grand Rapids, Michigan, became the first city to fluoridate its drinking water, the practice remains controversial. Some worry that fluoridated drinking water can lead to health issues, but what is the scientific consensus? (3:14 min.)

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There are a lot of studies that talk about the health benefits of breakfast. But some of them require a closer look. They don’t necessarily show that breakfast causes good health.

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From a blacksmith's son, to one of the most repeated names in physics textbooks, Michael Faraday embodies the spirit of scientific exploration. (3:46 min.)

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Why is #throwbackthursday so popular? Maybe it’s because nostalgia can make you feel happier, friendlier and warmer!

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In April 2016, three Let’s Talk Science outreach sites worked together to send a helium balloon to the edge of space. It was the first time that volunteers from the University of Guelph, McMaster University and the University of Toronto Mississauga had participated in the the National High Altitude Balloon Experiment.

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The elements had been listed and carefully arranged before Dmitri Mendeleev. They had even been organized by similar properties before. So why is Mendeelev's periodic table the one that has endured? (4:24 min.)

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Meter is the standard unit of length used by most countries around the world. But how did they define it? (4:44 min.)

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When we look at the sky, we have a flat, two-dimensional view. So how do astronomers figure the distances of stars and galaxies from Earth? (5:29 min.)

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Scientists can’t bring people back from the dead just yet. However, they have discovered that some parts of your cells remain active long after you die.

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